Link roundup : February 27, 2015

First, a note (now that I’ve gotten through the initial bustle of dealing with the news):

I’m job hunting again, since my position is being cut due to budget issues. I’m looking widely (and have already had some interviews) but if you’re reading this and know of a position that might suit someone with my interests and skills, feel free to point me in that direction.

  • My resume is online here (PDF).
  • The thing I most enjoy in library work is connecting people with information and resources that make their lives better, easier, or just more fun.
  • That translates into especially loving reference, instruction, reader’s advisory, and collection development, as well as a fascination with how we can use technology to do things better.
  • I’ve got a broad range of library skills beyond those things, too, and strong technology/user training/etc. skills and experience, but am not a coder. (I’d like to do more of that sometime.)
  • I’ve got a particular interest in accessibility issues, and in how collections and library services support and reflect the diversity of the community a given library serves and the world at large.
  • Geographically, I have some preferences, but I’m really looking for the right mix of job and life (I’d like to put down roots somewhere), and willing to consider a lot of options.
  • If you’ve ideas or other questions or want to talk about a possible job, feel free to contact me via the contact form (or the email on my resume).

On to the links! I didn’t manage a roundup two weeks ago because I was in Boston for job hunting purposes, so this is a long one.

Continue reading Link roundup : February 27, 2015

Links of Interest : January 16, 2015

This fortnight’s link roundup: ancient music, carnivorous sponges, copyright, evaluating information, and a lot more.

Continue reading Links of Interest : January 16, 2015

Links of Interest: January 2, 2015

I’ve been putting off this link roundup for reasons discussed last post, but I also have a bunch of links I want to share, so. Links!

Continue reading Links of Interest: January 2, 2015

Links of interest: September 10, 2014

I would normally wait until Friday to do this, but a particularly timely link came across my RSS reader last night…

Ada Initiative campaign:

When I read my RSS feeds last night, I discovered that a number of librarians have coordinated a campaign to donate to the Ada Initiative, which supports women in open technology and culture. You can read more about the matching donations campaign. That post includes links to other posts why this is so important for librarians and people working in (and using, and caring about) libraries that are worth reading too.

Continue reading Links of interest: September 10, 2014

Links of Interest : February 28, 2014

Welcome to another round of commentary and links.

Books: Since my last roundup of links, I have finished all the Phryne Fisher books (excellent and a lovely combo of knowing what I’d get out of them, and still having interesting bits).

Other recent reads include Code Name: Verity by Elizabeth Wein, which I found fascinating both for narrative structure and character voice, and for the time period (which is WWII.) It is not an easy book to read (without giving away plot spoilers, any book in Nazi-occupied France is not precisely going to be cheerful, really) but it has some delightful moments of friendship and brilliance and joy in amongst the horrible. (Also the pleasant realisation when I looked up her bio that I’d read and loved a number of her short stories, previously.)

Likewise, I adored Phoebe North’s Starglass which is about a generational starship about to reach its destination, with a bunch of interesting cultural twists (70% of the original population were Jewish, but a lot of it has shifted over the generations in interesting ways.)

Currently reading Monster of God: The Man-Eating Predator in the Jungles of History and the Mind by David Quammen, which is about – well, apex predators, people, their interactions, and is a fascinating mix of ecology, zoology, and history and therefore exceedingly up my alley.

Watching: As you can guess from my reading, I have now also watched Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries, and loved them (though also finding it fascinating how they differ from the books: I am mostly fine with the changes, but there are some substantial ones.) I’m looking forward to being able to get the second season here in the US. I then did a detour through Warehouse 13 and am currently part way through Eureka and enjoying them for knitting watching.

Links:

Beautiful things:

Libraries: 

Codes of contact: So, there’s been rather a lot of discussion in the library world about codes of contact for conventions and other things. Various links of relevance.

Other things:

Links of Interest : February 19, 2013

It’s been a while since my last one of these. Sorry!

Continue reading Links of Interest : February 19, 2013

A link roundup

So, yeah. Not doing so well with keeping up with the external blog. Let’s give this another try, and I’ll do a big roundup of links I keep meaning to share. (Which go back quite a few months.)

History and Memory:

  • A fascinating piece from the NYT about the challenges of the 9/11 museum.
  • An amazing take on why Machiavelli was so important to modern political thought.
  • Make your own Bayeux-style tapestry story. (done in HTML and JavaScript)
  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City has released PDF versions of many of their out of print exhibit catalogs. Many many many awesome things. I’d apologise for the hours of productive time you will lose from them, but it’s art. It’s gorgeous. It’s fascinating.
  • Wil Wheaton is generally thought-provoking, but I keep coming back to this recent piece from him about personal history and remembering.

Libraries, search, finding information: 

  • I think I originally bookmarked this piece from Dear Author for the discussion of ebook agreements, but it’s also got a great infographic of how important public libraries are.
  • Some really interesting comments on letting go of Boolean operators and other new approaches to teaching research.
  • Solving impossible research problems has some really interesting advanced tips. (It still does not solve a years-old problem for me, which is identifying a flower from a remembered smell. But.)
  • A nice intro to creating screencasts
  • Get your PhD in Googling. (Well, not really, but it’s fun).
  • The Pew study on libraries, library patrons, and ebooks (bunches of you have probably seen this.)
  • A fascinating article on a professor who set an assignment for his class to fool Wikipedia – and how he got caught.
  • An amusing library intro video, Lord of the Libraries.
  • Librarian in Black takes on the problems of ebooks and libraries. (She’s done it before, but this version is excellent.)

Books:

  • Dear Author takes on the question of authors putting up not-entirely-final copies of books, and the larger question of author/reader interaction.
  • Five Books takes on the History of Reading. (as in, reading books, not the place.)

Technology:

  • Joyce Valenza had an interesting piece on how we approach using technology, including comments and video from Sherry Turkle.
  • Vintage advertisements for modern technology. (You may have seen these already, because they have been all over the Internet. They’re still amusing.)
  • A really interesting look at how one piece of technology leads to a whole new interest and set of connections.
  • The complications of two-step verification (with a nice look at both pros and cons, and a personal story)
  • Doug Johnson has a great reminder of the proportional risk in online interaction (bullying, not predators).
Information:
  • I rather liked this Lifehacker piece on how to determine if controversial statement is scientifically true.
  • Historical notes on some widely-known songs. (Fascinating!)
  • I’ve been reading a lot of articles from Longform, which collects both current and older long-form articles on a huge variety of subjects. I’d handwave at a bunch of them, but really, go dig for yourself.
  • Rip currents are sort of fascinating. And lethal. Here, have a video about them.
  • A good friend did a roundup of links on Scandesotan  (I am moderately fluent in the dialect these days. Twelve years of living in Minnesota does that to you if you hang out with certain crowds. I’m still recalibrating for New England, which has some similarities and some differences.)
  • Turnitin.com has a sort of interesting study on the plagiarism they most often see.
  • Finding the first emigrant processed at Ellis Island.

And because I’ve been eyeing aurora borealis photos recently, have some gorgeous shots. Oregon. Northern Minnesota.

Links of interest: July 1st, 2011

Welcome to a very long links roundup, as it’s been a few weeks. (I expect they’ll be fairly regularly through most of July, and then sporadic, as I get myself moved and settled in Maine.) Since I’ve got a ton of links, let’s do these in some simple categories.

Continue reading Links of interest: July 1st, 2011

Links of interest: May 20, 2011

Welcome back after a hiatus (due to a combination of various things, including not having that many links I wanted to share for a week or two.)

Continue reading Links of interest: May 20, 2011

The power of the ‘Net

I’ve been thinking a lot recently about why it’s so important to figure out how to manage our digital lives more thoughtfully – and it’s been highlighted by two different job applications that came up recently (one for a school that’s very thoughtful about screen time, and another where I was talking in my cover letter about how I tie my love of the library and my love of technology together.)

Now, before we go any further, it’s probably obvious that I’m a passionate reader of books. I can count on the finger of both hands the number of times I’ve gone to sleep without reading for at least a few minutes. I read widely and deeply and broadly, in a rainbow of genres.

And I think, the same way, that there are lots of things that are part of our traditional images of libraries and learning that still matter – doing sustained reading, larger research projects, presentations, all those things. But I don’t think that’s enough.

When I’m talking about technology in either an educational or technology setting, I see books as one tool, but not the only one, and maybe not the major one. The larger question is something different: it’s not about simply how to use the tool, but about what the tool can and can’t do for us.

Which brings us to the Internet:

I’ve been online since 1994, when I first got to college. In that time, I’ve made friends, gotten frustrated, planned projects, taught classes (including teaching music theory in a pure-text environment, which was an interesting trick!), learned leadership skills, taught myself about any number of things. And that’s before we get into any of my actual professional or formal educational work – all those things are just the things I did on my own, self-directed, because they were interesting.

Every major news story in the past 15 years, I learned about online before I heard about it from TV or radio news. (There’s one exception: I learned about the 35W bridge collapse while sitting in the computer lab at grad school working on an assignment, as someone walked in having just heard it on the radio before the online stories were up – but I would have seen an online story through my usual haunts inside of five minutes.)

The Internet has kept me in touch with friends – that’s the thing everyone knows it’s good for, especially in our current Facebook era. But it’s more than that: it’s making new connections.

In a job hunt where I’m being very geographically flexible, I’ve found time and time again that if I say “Hey, looking at a job in [wherever]” someone I’m linked to through my personal online accounts will know useful things about the area, or is glad to put me in touch with someone who’s just as glad to share. Or they’ll know someone who graduated from there. Or something else that lets me dig more deeply into what’d be like to live and work in that place. (And it’s been true even for places where I would have sworn it’d be unlikely.)

As someone who did a major cross-country move in 1999, when these tools weren’t nearly so wide spread, I’m delighted by that every time.

And it’s in making other connections – running into someone in a discussion in a forum about our shared religion, and discovering we’ve got academic and professional interests in common. Learning about someone through their hobby, and finding out they write great and passionate and amazing blog posts about another topic that I happen to be helping someone with. And much more.

But it’s also in my professional life.

One of the stories I tell about the power of the Internet goes like this. In the fall of 2009, a student – someone I knew was a brillant, engaged, amazing student – came to me looking for some reference help.

She was taking AP European History, and she wanted to argue, for one of her papers, that you couldn’t consider an era truly ‘modern’ until it had consideration for the role of women and minorities in the culture. (Not that they’d solved the problems – but that they were part of general public conversation and political discourse.) She needed some sources to support her argument.

I looked at that, went “Hey, great topic.” and she and I sat down to do some digging on it. We tried a lot of different approaches, but we kept not finding the right thing. She had to go to class after about 20 minutes so I promised I’d keep working, and I did about another 25 minutes (and brainstormed with my assistant, and tried a few other things) before deciding I needed a different approach.

I posted a request to my personal journal, basically saying “I know various of you have a particular interest in women’s history and diversity studies – any ideas?” and with a few notes about what was accessible in a useful timeframe.

I posted it at 10:55. By 11:15, I had a response with the perfect essay to solve the source problem. (In an older but classic collection that the library owned, even!) Within another hour, I’d had a couple more suggestions, and another reference to the same title’s usefulness.

Now, I could have spent hours poking at that – and likely have found the book, but only after skimming through other titles that might be relevant first (and not having time to spend on other good and useful things that were good for other students, the library, etc.).

With the shared knowledge of my friends, it was a much faster process, and I could get back to a busy and highly engaged student at lunch, and say “Hey, here’s this great book, and here’s some other suggestions, and now that I’ve got those classic articles, here’s a couple more ideas of things to try in JSTOR and other databases.” She thought it was pretty awesome, too.

This is – again – one of those things we’re not really teaching, as technology education professionals.

It’s not just about the tools, and how to use them.

It’s about how we choose to use them, and what we can do in small pieces, now and going forward, that build those connections and create those interactions, so that ‘news’ is not a thing we listen to at 6pm, but a thing that’s flowing around us throughout the day, or that research is not just something we ask a librarian (though there are lots of times that’s a good thing to do) but where we’ve got connections to friends with a wide range of expertise and knowledge in many places.

That’s not easy. For one thing, learning how to sort out all those different sources of information, and figure out which ones are useful or reliable or meaningful gets pretty complicated. But at the same time, can we afford not to have these skills?

And perhaps most importantly, it’s about how we dance with the technology in our lives, in this time of ‘always on’ access. What happens when we turn off the phone, or take a break from the screen? What happens when we want time for focused work, or extended play? How do we recognise our own personal temptations, and find ways to manage them? There are lots of good conversations about these things out there already – but we can use more.

The more I think about this, the more I think that it’s probably the essential question schools need to answer in the next decade or so – and particularly, how to help students for whom various parts of this (creating healthy, balanced connections with others, having access to technology tools but not living under their control,  being comfortable with complexity and issues that don’t have easy answers, and much more) doesn’t come naturally.

Hi, I’m Jen

Librarian, infovore, and general geek, likely to write comments about books, link collections, and other thoughts related to how we find, use, and take joy in information.

I'm the Research Librarian at Perkins (You may know the name as Perkins School for the Blind but they do a lot of other things these days). More about my job.

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